“Celebrating the Creative Process: An Open Call”

Celebrating the Creative Process: An Open Call
December 5 – December 30, 2017
Juror: Kat Kiernan

PhotoPlace Gallery
3 Park Street
Middlebury, VT 05753

 

Juror’s Statement:

“Ansel Adams famously declared, “you don’t take a photograph, you make it.” We make choices each time we press the shutter. The strongest photographers have always been those who understood their choices and could intuit which variables to hold tightly and which to set wandering. This philosophy is central to my approach to photography as an image-maker, curator, and publisher of Don’t Take Pictures.

Celebrating the Creative Process is an open call, giving artists free range to explore the myriad choices that go into the making of a considered photograph. When jurying this exhibition, I sought works that embraced the idea of photographing with intention and of carefully considering the elements of each image. This exhibition contains imagery in which the photographer meticulously transformed an idea in their mind into a final print. Some of these photographs reflect careful planning. Others rely on choices made in the moment when light, composition, and movement came together for one fraction of a second, just long enough for a photographer with carefully honed instincts to frame and record. Still others were created through the art of post-production, when a group of photographs are transformed into something new and magical through composite imagery. Each is a photograph that is made and not taken, and reflects deliberate choices that make it more than the sum of its parts.” ~Kat Kiernan

“Little by Little”

“Little by Little”
Art Intersection

Juror: Dr. Julie Sasse

Gilbert, Arizona
October 24 – December 2
Artists Reception
Saturday, October 28, 6 – 8pm

 

Juror’s Statement:

“It has been a great pleasure to serve as the guest juror for Art Intersection’s Little by Little. I am honored to be selected for this opportunity because it gives me a chance to learn more about new art being exhibited in the Southwest and to become better acquainted with Art Intersection’s supportive environment for the arts. My thanks go to the many artists who submitted works for this exhibition and to the Art Intersection team who organized this project.

This exhibition gives the viewer a snapshot of the creative ideas and originality and artists’ heartfelt connections to their mediums and concepts. Arizona has limited venues for emerging and mid-career artists to exhibit their work compared to more densely populated states, so this exhibition offers a link between the creative product and those who derive pleasure and insight from viewing it.This is a small works exhibition, but that does not mean the works are less in content or aesthetic and conceptual value. I believe artists should make art in the scale that best serves their ideas, and if the works are small, they are still important if created with sincerity. Some of the most poignant works I have seen over the years are not the most grand in scale, but suitable for the message intended. If anything, small works allow us to concentrate on an idea and an image because of the intimacy provided by the unassuming, though purposeful size. They encourage us to block out the noise of the gigantic in favor of contemplative statements. I hope you will enjoy Little by Little and let yourself connect to the works in a personal relationship.” ~Dr. Julie Sasse, guest juror

 

“Fairy Tales & Nuclear Bombs (What Happened to the Summer of Love)”

“Fairy Tales & Nuclear Bombs (What Happened to the Summer of Love)” 
Lightbox Photographic Gallery
October 14 – November 7, 2017
Juror: Diane Fenster

 

Juror’s Statement:

“The Summer of Love and the hippie revolution were primarily centered on remaining outside the taint of the major societal forces of war and greed. Dreams were cultivated spiritually and chemically. The post WWII years of repressive ideas, clothing and regimentation exploded into a wide array of color and music and dance, expressions of both individual dreams and visions of a society which nurtured creativity and personal liberty to the utmost while taking consideration of the environment in a sustainable way.
Now decades later the tie dye clothes are as tattered as the dreams. What was lost was more than these brief experiments in lifestyle but an imagination which honored ones’ visions and possibilities of a joyful existence. Though those aspirations of youth now seem distant, there is a residual flame, burning deep and still revolutionary and radical in it’s demand for joy and love.”
For this call I’d like to see your dreams or nightmares as we face the anxiety of the present.” ~ Diane Fenster

“Nothing Special” — L.A. Photo Curator

“NOTHING SPECIAL” — L.A. Photo Curator: International Photography Awards – ‘Where Photography & Philanthropy Meet’

Curator Bree Lamb

Lamb says, “From the spontaneity and unpredictability of street photography to the artfully crafted still life to the happenstance urbanscape and far beyond, photographers have long been able to create powerful, beautiful work drawing from the banality of everyday life.

How do you make something compelling out of nothing special? This question has become compounded as the ubiquity of image-making and image-sharing has reached at an all-time peak and is steadily growing through various social media outlets. In a time when we are sharing, “liking,” and viewing more images than ever, how are you
seeing and capturing the world around you?

This call is looking for well-seen images of the everyday – the benign, the boring, the overlooked. I’m curious as to how you view the world, and in particular how you capture the subtle, in-between moments, people and spaces that are such a large part of our daily lives. Whether found, staged, or manipulated, all subject matter and methods of capture are welcome.”

“Other Worlds” SE Center for Photography

“Other Worlds” with juror Tom Chambers

SE Center for Photography
1239 Pendleton Street
Greenville, SC 29611

October 6-28

“We asked to see Other Worlds, real or imagined, dreams, nightmares,
the impossible and the unusual. The SE Center was looking for images that pushed reality to the edges of the frame, staged, contrived or candid, digital,
analog, or antique processes.”